Dehydration and Allergies – Is There a Connection?

If you’ve ever had allergies you know how miserable they can be. And the antihistamines you have to take to keep them under control are just as bad, making you drowsy and loopy. During allergy season I have a cabinet full of every all natural solution I can find. Since I was taking so many pills, I had to drink a lot more water with them.

I noticed that when I drank more water the allergies seemed to get a little better, so I was wondering if there was any kind of connection between dehydration and allergies.

It turns out that when you’re dehydrated, histamine increases, and decreases when you increase your water intake. You also need proper salt intake. Water and salt are two of mother nature’s strongest natural antihistamines. Elevated histamine triggers your thirst response and so does salt.

I had always heard that salt was bad for you, but after I started looking into adrenal and thyroid problems I realized I needed much more salt than I was getting.

Sea salt can help reduce inflammation and boost your immune system. Salt is also very good for your adrenals, especially if you also have thyroid problems. After increasing my salt intake I’ve noticed a big difference in both.

During the hot summer months it’s even more important to make sure you drink enough water to stay hydrated, especially if you are prone to allergies.

If you stay hydrated your body is better able to react to allergens and it won’t have to produce its own histamines because you don’t have enough water to stay hydrated.

It’s estimated that at least 80% of the population is in a state of chronic dehydration.

If you are prone to allergies, make sure you are constantly drinking enough water throughout the day. It’s much better to reach for the water bottle than the anti-histamine!

 

Dehydration and Runners

Water is one of the most important things a runner can consume. About 60% of a runner’s total body weight is water. Water helps maintain body temperature, improve digestion, and helps with circulation and excretion of wastes.

If a runner doesn’t drink enough water, they won’t able to sweat adequately, and this is how body temperature is regulated. If they don’t drink enough water their body temperature will rise. This can negatively impact physical performance and will eventually cause dehydration. Even a very small amount of dehydration can impact a runner’s athletic performance. Thirst is not an indicator of dehydration. Dehydration can happen before an athlete even becomes thirsty.

The body will pull water from its reserves when it’s deprived of fluids to maintain a safe body temperature. If the body is chronically low on water, a variety of hormonal changes can occur. Extra water should be taken to avoid an imbalance if a runner is drinking alcohol or coffee.

The small intestine can absorb water at a rate of 8-10 ounces about every 20 minutes. Drinking cold water is better because it will enter the small intestine faster. Take small sips before, during, and after your workout to avoid dehydration. Make sure not to drink large amounts all at once. Spacing out your water is better for the body.

The only way for a runner to prevent dehydration is to make sure they are properly hydrated before, during, and after a training run. Make sure you have water readily available during training and make sure you drink enough water before and after a training run. Know what your sweat rate is. It can be different for different people. Know how much fluid you’ll need to replace. A good rule of thumb is to drink about 20 ounces of water for every pound of weight lost because of sweating.

Some runners think that water is just too plain and boring. If that’s you, try a good sports drink with your favorite flavor. The most important thing is to make sure you replace fluids and stay hydrated.

If you have signs of dehydration, like weakness, headache, thirst, dizziness or chills, not only is your running going to suffer, but you’re putting yourself in danger of a heat related problem. It’s better to avoid that in the first place by making sure you are drinking enough water.как продвигать сайт в социальных сетях

Running and Dehydration

Athletes will go to great lengths to shave seconds off of their running time, and that includes runners. So running and dehydration should be one of the first things to be aware of. As little as 2% dehydration could slow a runner down and have a negative impact on their performance. Studies show that you tend to slow down about 2% for each 1% loss in bodyweight because of dehydration.

When the body loses water content and essential body salts, dehydration can occur.

It’s easy for pros and beginners alike to underestimate how much water they need to drink to stay hydrated. Once they get to the point of being thirsty, dehydration is already setting in. 2% of your body weight can be lost before you actually feel thirsty.

Marathon trainers will tell you to start hydrating several days before you begin training. Drink more water more often than you normally do. Drink at least sixteen ounces of water or sports drink several hours before you go running and drink a few ounces of water or sports drink at least every fifteen minutes during your run. Drinking cold water will keep your body at a normal temperature.

Some of the symptoms of dehydration include:

Thirst, Fatigue, Confusion, Dizziness, Headaches, Dry skin, Skin flushing, Muscle weakness, Increased heart rate.

A good way to determine if you are drinking enough water is by checking urine color. It should be light or clear in color. The darker the urine color, the more dehydrated you are. This is a sign that you need to start drinking more water.

Running in the heat accelerates dehydration. That’s why you need to take precautions to avoid both dehydration and heat stroke. It can take up to two weeks of running in the heat to acclimate your body to the hot temperatures.

Water and electrolytes are lost through sweat and need to be replaced. Essential body salts, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate need to be replaced. This can be done with a good electrolyte drink mix. It will also improve your performance since it will help to hydrate you better. Sodium replacement is essential for prolonged running.

Sodium helps the body to retain fluid and potassium is essential for muscle and nerve function. The body needs a balance of these to function properly. Too much or too little sodium can be devastating. Too much or too little potassium can seriously affect the nervous system. That’s why you need a good, balanced electrolyte drink.

Running Safety

Running is basically a safe sport, but there are some things to consider to make sure you are as safe as you can be. I learned the hard way about running safety years ago as I headed out the door on a hot summer afternoon with no water on hand. I passed out from dehydration.

So, the first tip on running safety is to make sure you are hydrated before you head out, and always carry enough water on you. You should drink small sips about every 20 minutes or so.

Other things you should carry with you are a whistle, cell phone and pepper spray. These are good safety items anyway, but do make sure you have them while running.

Just like when you are hiking or rock climbing, if you are going to be out on a long run, make sure you tell others where you are going and approximately when you’ll be coming home.

Run facing the traffic so you can avoid an erratic driver. Also, wear reflective clothing if you are running at a time when there isn’t sufficient sunlight. This can be as simple as a reflective vest or reflective tape on your clothes. But do make sure you can be seen in the dark.

Stay alert at all times and don’t be vulnerable. Stay away from isolated areas or areas you aren’t familiar with. Use your intuition and avoid questionable areas that you just aren’t sure about or trust completely. If you see people that are suspicious, keep a sharp eye out for them. Same with suspicious cars. Practice memorizing license plates (it’s good for your brain anyway!).

Follow these tips and use your common sense while out running to avoid any potential running safety problems.

Effects of Dehydration on Running

Athletes will go to great lengths to shave seconds off of their running time, and that includes runners. So the effects of dehydration on running should be one of the first things to be aware of. As little as 2% dehydration could slow a runner down and have a negative impact on their performance. Studies show that you tend to slow down about 2% for each 1% loss in bodyweight because of dehydration.

When the body loses water content and essential body salts, dehydration can occur.

It’s easy for pros and beginners alike to underestimate how much water they need to drink to stay hydrated. Once they get to the point of being thirsty, dehydration is already setting in. 2% of your body weight can be lost before you actually feel thirsty.

Marathon runners will tell you to start hydrating several days before you begin training. Drink more water more often than you normally do. Drink at least sixteen ounces of water or sports drink several hours before you go running and drink a few ounces of water or sports drink at least every fifteen minutes during your run. Drinking cold water will keep your body at a normal temperature.

Some of the symptoms of dehydration include:

* Thirst
* Fatigue
* Confusion
* Dizziness
* Headaches
* Dry skin
* Skin flushing
* Muscle weakness
* Increased heart rate

A good way to determine if you are drinking enough water is by checking urine color. It should be light or clear in color. The darker the urine color, the more dehydrated you are. This is a sign that you need to start drinking more water.

Running in the heat accelerates dehydration. That’s why you need to take precautions to avoid both dehydration and heat stroke. It can take up to two weeks of running in the heat to acclimate your body to the hot temperatures.

Water and electrolytes are lost through sweat and need to be replaced. Essential body salts, such as sodium, potassium, and phosphate need to be replaced. This can be done with a good electrolyte drink mix. It will also improve your performance since it will help to hydrate you better. Sodium replacement is essential for prolonged running.

Sodium helps the body to retain fluid and potassium is essential for muscle and nerve function. The body needs a balance of these to function properly. Too much or too little sodium can be devastating. Too much or too little potassium can seriously affect the nervous system.

A good balanced electrolyte drink will do wonders to improve a runner’s performance. Runners need to drink enough water to give them the edge they need to compete.